Wednesday, July 30, 2008

Bush:The Gift That Keeps On Giving

Abu Khabab al-Masri 'died' in January 2006 and again on Monday. Once again, the 'mainstream' media announces the re-killing of another 'key al-Qaeda operative' by a 'CIA-operated unpiloted drone!' These top al-Qaeda operatives - and their subsequent deaths - are more bountiful than poppy fields in Afghanistan or oil smuggling routes in Iraq.
 
The Financial Times reports:
 
Al-Qaeda expert killed by CIA 30 July 2008 Pakistan intelligence officials yesterday confirmed a key al-Qaeda expert on chemical and biological weapons was killed in an attack by a CIA-operated unpiloted drone, late on Sunday. Egyptian-born Midhat Mursi al-Sayid Umar, who was also known as Abu Khabab al-Masri, was one of six Arab men who were killed in a remote region along the Afghan border, according to an intelligence official. The US had offered a $5m (€3.19m, £2.5m) reward for his capture.
Western diplomats said it would be a boost to morale in the Bush administration, struggling with mounting troop casualties in Afghanistan and a revival of militant attacks in Iraq.
 
CBS News reports:
Officials: Al Qaeda's Mad Scientist Killed --CIA Drone Targeted Chemical Weapons Expert Abu Khabab Al-Masri On Afghanistan-Pakistan Border 29 Jul 2008 One of al Qaeda's top chemical and biological weapons experts was killed in an air strike by a CIA pilotless drone in a remote Pakistani border region, senior Pakistani intelligence officials told CBS News Tuesday morning. Intelligence officials investigating the early Monday missile attack confirmed that Midhat Mursi al-Sayid Umar, also known as Abu Khabab al-Masri was one of six men killed and his remains had been positively identified... The timing of the report on al-Masri's death also aroused suspicion - coinciding with a visit to the White House by Pakistani Prime Minister Yusuf Raza Gilani. In the past week two U.S. officials, speaking on deep background, told CBS News that they expected Pakistan to overtly demonstrate its support for the U.S. fight against terrorism by assisting in the arrest or killing of an important Islamic militant, close to the time of Gilani's Washington trip.
But, looky here!
 
U.S. Strike Killed Al Qaeda Bomb Maker --Terror Big Also Trained 'Shoe Bomber,' Moussaoui 18 Jan 2006 ABC News has learned that Pakistani officials now believe that al Qaeda's master bomb maker and chemical weapons expert was one of the men killed in last week's U.S. missile attack in eastern Pakistan. Midhat Mursi, 52, also known as Abu Khabab al-Masri, was identified by Pakistani authorities as one of four known major al Qaeda leaders present at an apparent terror summit in the village of Damadola early last Friday morning. The United States had posted a $5 million reward for Mursi's capture.
And here!
 
Abu Khabab al-Masri: A Master of Terror 18 Jun 2006 According to a growing number of media reports, a recent U.S. airstrike on a Pakistani border village has likely killed a senior Egyptian Al-Qaida commander named Midhat Mursi (a.k.a. Abu Khabab al-Masri). Since the late 1980s, Abu Khabab has served as a top military aide and deputy to Dr. Ayman al-Zawahiri in Afghanistan. Mursi was responsible for co-managing Al-Qaida's notorious Derunta military training complex near Jalalabad, where he maintained his own elite terrorist graduate school aptly named the "Abu Khabab Camp."
No worries. The New York Times covers for the Bush regime:
 
Bush Praises Pakistan Just Hours After U.S. Strike 29 Jul 2008 President [sic] Bush on Monday praised Pakistan's commitment to fighting extremists along its deteriorating border with Afghanistan, only hours after an American missile strike destroyed what American and Pakistani officials described as a militant outpost in the region, killing at least six fighters. Mr. Bush, meeting with Pakistan's prime minister, Yousaf Raza Gilani, at the White House, sought to minimize growing concerns that Pakistan's willingness to fight extremists was waning, allowing the Taliban and Al Qaeda to regroup inside Pakistan and plan new attacks there and beyond. Senior American officials, including Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice just three days ago, publicly scolded Pakistan for not doing more to root out safe havens like the one bombed on Monday in Azam Warsak, a village in South Waziristan near the Afghan border. Among those believed to have been killed in the missile attack, evidently carried out by a remotely piloted aircraft operated by the Central Intelligence Agency, was an Egyptian identified as a senior Qaeda trainer and weapons expert, according to residents and officials in the area, as well as American officials. Neither the operative's identity nor that of the others has been confirmed. The officials spoke anonymously because of the political and diplomatic sensitivities of attacking targets in Pakistan. The Egyptian operative, Midhat Mursi al-Sayid Umar, also known as Abu Khabab al-Masri, appears on the State Department's list of 37 most-wanted terrorists, with a reward of $5 million for his capture... He was falsely reported to have been killed in a similar attack in January 2006 in news accounts that attributed the claim to Pakistani officials. T
 
he timing of Monday's strike, the latest in a series by remotely piloted American aircraft inside Pakistan, coincided with the first official visit by Mr. Gilani to the United States.

Sunday, July 27, 2008

Call CBS News

http://www.breasttreatment.org/previous_events.html
Call CBS News   
 
Tell CBS News that they need to broadcast the complete John McCain interview from the July 22 Evening News, and that they need to inform their viewers, on the air and online, about their policy on editing interviews.
 
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When contacting the media, please be polite and professional. Express your specific concerns regarding that particular news report or commentary, and be sure to indicate exactly what you would like the media outlet to do differently in the future.
 
 


  
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Saturday, July 26, 2008

DNC slams McCain for calling Iraq 'first' post-9/11 conflict

Update: DNC slams McCain for calling Iraq 'first' post-9/11 conflict

Keeping up with John McCain's foreign policy gaffes is becoming a cottage industry these days, and a progressive radio host has caught another slip-up from the Republican presidential nominee talking about the war on terror.
And keeping those flubs away from viewers is occupying plenty of network news editors' time.
Young Turks host Cenk Uygur noticed that his confusion about the timeline of the "surge" in Iraq wasn't McCain's only gaffe in his interview with CBS news this week. McCain seemed to forget the war in Afghanistan preceded the invasion of Iraq; either that or he didn't think it was a major conflict.
"The fact is we had four years of failed policy. ... We were losing the war in Iraq. The consequences of failure. The defeat of the United States of America in the first major conflict since 9/11 would have had devastating impacts throughout the region and the world," McCain told CBS anchor Katie Couric.
"Was Afghanistan not major enough for him?" Uygur asks.
Like his previous flub, CBS edited this misstatement from its broadcast. The full version of the interview, which only aired online, also saw McCain wrongly crediting the surge with sparking the "Anbar Awakening," in which tribal leaders began to turn against al Qaeda in Iraq.
The Anbar Awakening gaffe was edited out and replaced with McCain's scurrilous attack accusing Democratic nominee Barack Obama of caring more about winning the election than winning a war. Crooks & Liars notes that bit of editing violated CBS's own Standards & Practices because they edited in an answer from an earlier question and changed the meaning of McCain's statement.
The latest bit of tricky editing does not seem to have changed McCain's overall meaning, and virtually all interviews are edited before they are broadcast. It seems the network in this case simply saved McCain from a bit of embarrassment in front of the evening news audience.
Uygur is willing to give McCain the benefit of the doubt in this case, and assumes he does actually know the war in Afghanistan started more than a year before Iraq.
"In all likelihood, this was a simple mental mistake for McCain, among a litany of others recently," Uygur writes. "But it does go toward state of mind. They never saw Afghanistan as a priority."
The Democratic National Committee was less forgiving toward the GOP nominee.
"It is disappointing that John McCain doesn't recognize that the war in Afghanistan was not only the first major conflict after 9/11, and is in fact a major front in the fight against terrorism," DNC spokeswoman Karen Finney said in an e-mail to reporters a few hours after Uygur's article was posted. "No wonder John McCain doesn't understand why the American people are looking for new leadership that will bring the war in Iraq to a responsible end so we can direct the resources we need to getting the job done in Afghanistan."
Uygur posted the following video to YouTube Thursday:
This video is from CBS's Evening News, broadcast July 22, 2008.
A transcript of the exchange follows, with the some parts cut from the CBS broadcast hightlighted:
Couric: Senator McCain, Sen. Obama says, while the increased number of U.S. troops contributed to increased security in Iraq, he also credits the Sunni awakening and the Shiite government going after militias. And says that there might have been improved security even without the surge. What's your response to that?
McCain: [Sen. Obama has indicated that by his failure to acknowledge the success of the surge, that he would rather lose a war than lose a campaign. ...] I don't know how you respond to something that is such a false depiction of what actually happened. Colonel McFarlane (phonetic) was contacted by one of the major Sunni sheiks. Because of the surge we were able to go out and protect that sheik and others. And it began the Anbar awakening. I mean, that's just a matter of history. Thanks to General Petraeus, our leadership, and the sacrifice of brave young Americans. I mean, to deny that their sacrifice didn't make possible the success of the surge in Iraq, I think, does a great disservice to young men and women who are serving and have sacrificed.
They were out there. They were protecting these sheiks. We had the Anbar awakening. We now have a government that's effective. We have a legal system that's working, although poorly. And we have progress on all fronts, including an incredible measure of security for the people of Iraq. There will still be attacks. Al Qaeda's not defeated. But the progress has been immense. And to not recognize that, and why it happened, and how it happened, I think is really quite a commentary.
Couric: A commentary on what?
McCain: That Sen. Obama does not understand the challenges we face. And … not understand the need for the surge. And the fact that he did not understand that, and still denies that it has succeeded, I think the American people will make their judgment....
Couric: Sen. Obama also told me, Sen. McCain, that the money spent on those additional troops, on the surge, might have been more effective had it gone to Afghanistan or even to a better energy policy in the United States. What's your response?
McCain: The fact is we had four years of failed policy. We were losing. We were losing the war in Iraq. The consequences of failure and defeat of the United States of America in the first major conflict since 9/11 would have had devastating impacts throughout the region and the world.


  
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Gov. Tim Pawlenty's former Spokesman busted for soliciting prostitute

 
Potential McCain Veep pick, Tim Pawlenty spokesman arrested.
 
He served as a spokesman for Gov. Tim Pawlenty's campaign in 2002 and for the Bush-Cheney campaign in Minnesota in 2004," the report continues. "Most recently, Hong was a point person for presidential candidate Mike Huckabee," though the paper notes that according to a spokesperson for the Minnesota GOP, he is not currently working for any state candidate.
Hong had no comment when reached by phone, the paper says. Pioneer Press reports


  
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Thursday, July 24, 2008

Wednesday, July 23, 2008

CBS Covers Up MCcain's Major Gaffe

Gaffes Happen may soon become the official McCain campaign teeshirt. They should be careful what they wish for as McCain will be getting more news coverage than they might care for with his latest gaffe.

Politicians put their foot in their mouth on a regular basis. Sometimes it may be the result of long hours on the campaign trail, sometimes because they simply can't keep their facts straight and sometimes because they can't keep their lies straight. Sometimes it's simply because they do not understand the facts.
Couric/McCain Interview:
Countdown with Keith Olbermann reports:

Senator John McCain... Now staking his candidacy entirely on the surge. Entirely on his claim that he believed in the need for a surge of U-S forces in Iraq ... even before President Bush did. Tonight has proven that he does not understand one of the fundamental facts about it.



GO TO FULL STORY >>


Update: DNC slams McCain for calling Iraq 'first' post-9/11 conflict
Keeping up with John McCain's foreign policy gaffes is becoming a cottage industry these days, and a progressive radio host has caught another slip-up from the Republican presidential nominee talking about the war on terror.
And keeping those flubs away from viewers is occupying plenty of network news editors' time.
Young Turks host Cenk Uygur noticed that his confusion about the timeline of the "surge" in Iraq wasn't McCain's only gaffe in his interview with CBS news this week. McCain seemed to forget the war in Afghanistan preceded the invasion of Iraq; either that or he didn't think it was a major conflict.
"The fact is we had four years of failed policy. ... We were losing the war in Iraq. The consequences of failure. The defeat of the United States of America in the first major conflict since 9/11 would have had devastating impacts throughout the region and the world," McCain told CBS anchor Katie Couric.
"Was Afghanistan not major enough for him?" Uygur asks.
Like his previous flub, CBS edited this misstatement from its broadcast. The full version of the interview, which only aired online, also saw McCain wrongly crediting the surge with sparking the "Anbar Awakening," in which tribal leaders began to turn against al Qaeda in Iraq.
The Anbar Awakening gaffe was edited out and replaced with McCain's scurrilous attack accusing Democratic nominee Barack Obama of caring more about winning the election than winning a war. Crooks & Liars notes that bit of editing violated CBS's own Standards & Practices because they edited in an answer from an earlier question and changed the meaning of McCain's statement.
The latest bit of tricky editing does not seem to have changed McCain's overall meaning, and virtually all interviews are edited before they are broadcast. It seems the network in this case simply saved McCain from a bit of embarrassment in front of the evening news audience.
Uygur is willing to give McCain the benefit of the doubt in this case, and assumes he does actually know the war in Afghanistan started more than a year before Iraq.
"In all likelihood, this was a simple mental mistake for McCain, among a litany of others recently," Uygur writes. "But it does go toward state of mind. They never saw Afghanistan as a priority."
The Democratic National Committee was less forgiving toward the GOP nominee.
"It is disappointing that John McCain doesn’t recognize that the war in Afghanistan was not only the first major conflict after 9/11, and is in fact a major front in the fight against terrorism," DNC spokeswoman Karen Finney said in an e-mail to reporters a few hours after Uygur's article was posted. "No wonder John McCain doesn’t understand why the American people are looking for new leadership that will bring the war in Iraq to a responsible end so we can direct the resources we need to getting the job done in Afghanistan."
Uygur posted the following video to YouTube Thursday:
This video is from CBS's Evening News, broadcast July 22, 2008.
Download video
A transcript of the exchange follows, with the some parts cut from the CBS broadcast hightlighted:
Couric: Senator McCain, Sen. Obama says, while the increased number of U.S. troops contributed to increased security in Iraq, he also credits the Sunni awakening and the Shiite government going after militias. And says that there might have been improved security even without the surge. What's your response to that?
McCain: [Sen. Obama has indicated that by his failure to acknowledge the success of the surge, that he would rather lose a war than lose a campaign. ...] I don't know how you respond to something that is such a false depiction of what actually happened. Colonel McFarlane (phonetic) was contacted by one of the major Sunni sheiks. Because of the surge we were able to go out and protect that sheik and others. And it began the Anbar awakening. I mean, that's just a matter of history. Thanks to General Petraeus, our leadership, and the sacrifice of brave young Americans. I mean, to deny that their sacrifice didn't make possible the success of the surge in Iraq, I think, does a great disservice to young men and women who are serving and have sacrificed.
They were out there. They were protecting these sheiks. We had the Anbar awakening. We now have a government that's effective. We have a legal system that's working, although poorly. And we have progress on all fronts, including an incredible measure of security for the people of Iraq. There will still be attacks. Al Qaeda's not defeated. But the progress has been immense. And to not recognize that, and why it happened, and how it happened, I think is really quite a commentary.
Couric: A commentary on what?
McCain: That Sen. Obama does not understand the challenges we face. And … not understand the need for the surge. And the fact that he did not understand that, and still denies that it has succeeded, I think the American people will make their judgment....
Couric: Sen. Obama also told me, Sen. McCain, that the money spent on those additional troops, on the surge, might have been more effective had it gone to Afghanistan or even to a better energy policy in the United States. What's your response?
McCain: The fact is we had four years of failed policy. We were losing. We were losing the war in Iraq. The consequences of failure and defeat of the United States of America in the first major conflict since 9/11 would have had devastating impacts throughout the region and the world.

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Monday, July 21, 2008

Nevada Republicans Cancel Convention

"Citing a lack of interest, the Nevada Republican Party has called off its state convention and will instead pick its delegates to the national convention by private conference call," the Wall Street Journal reports.

"The news provides further evidence of a fractured and unenthusiastic Republican Party in some parts of the country."



  
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Monday, July 14, 2008

JAG officer wants Bush tried for war crimes

U.S. officer wants Bush tried for war crimes --Joe Abodeely joins ranks with Vincent Bugliosi By Mark Yannone 13 Jul 2008 From the KPHX radio station in Phoenix, Arizona, Colonel Joe Abodeely told his worldwide radio audience on Saturday exactly how and why he expects George W. Bush to be prosecuted for the war crimes he committed as president  of the United States.


  
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Saturday, July 12, 2008

Obama Slipping In The Polls

According to Rasmussen Reports, Obama is slipping in support. For most of the past month-and-a-half, Obama has led McCain by approximately five percentage points. It remains to be seen whether this recent tightening of the race reflects real change or is merely statistical noise. Check out their weekly review—What They Told Us—to see what was on voters' minds this past week.
 


  
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Sunday, July 06, 2008

Does the gun ruling hurt the NRA?

Here, on the 4th of July weekend  we celebrate the successful armed rebellion by America's founders, is the thought question of the day.
For years, anti-gun activists and others have whispered that the National Rifle Association, the most powerful gun lobby in the nation and one of the most powerful Washington lobbies on any issue, has really never wanted the Supreme Court to define the Second Amendment.
Why? Well, the theory went that a ruling such as the one the court handed down last week in District of Columbia v. Heller could dent the group where it hurts the most: fundraising.
After all, the NRA became the powerhouse that it is today largely because of the basic proposition it offered the American voter: The government wants to take your guns away.
Continue reading "Supreme Court gun ruling could backfire" » 


  
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Friday, July 04, 2008

Top Military Official Sounds Like Obama

Joint Chiefs Chairman Mike Mullen says:
"I don't have troops I can reach for, brigades I can reach to send into Afghanistan until I have a reduced requirement in Iraq." (Video)


  
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Wednesday, July 02, 2008

Democrats 200 Republicans 174 Leaners 146 Toss-Up 18


 
State By State Balance of Power
Safe
GOP
(36)
Likely
GOP
(138)
Leans
GOP
(53)
Toss
Up
(18)
Leans
Dem
(93)
Likely
Dem
(53)
Safe
Dem
(147)
ID (4)
DE (3)
DC (3)
 
HI (4)
OK (7)
   
IN (11)
   
WY (3)
   
       
       
         
RI (4)
         
VT (3)
 
ND (3)
         
           
           
           
           
           

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
For My Prediction Go Here:
 
 


  
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Days Since Michael Steele Said He Won't Resign

23 Days, 23 Hours, 32 Minutes, 38 Seconds.

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